Roofs and Attics

Attic Access Pull-Down Stairs

An attic pull-down ladder, also called an attic pull down stairs or stairway, is a collapsible ladder that is permanently attached to the attic floor. It is used to access the attic without being required to use a portable ladder, which can be unstable as well as inconvenient.

 

Common Concerns

It is typical for the homeowner to install the attic pull-down stairs, especially if it’s an older home or a newer home that’s been built upward in order to use the attic for living or storage space. That is why these stairs rarely meet safety standards and are prone to a number of issues.

Some of the more common issues include:

  • Cut bottom cord of structural truss – The homeowner may have cut through a structural member while installing a pull-down ladder, unknowingly weakening the structure. Structural members should not be modified without an engineer’s approval.
  • Fastened with improper nails or screws. Drywall or deck screws may be used instead of the standard 16d penny nails or ¼x3-inch lag screws. Nails and screws that are intended for other purposes may have reduced shear strength and may not support the pull-down ladder.
  • Fastened with an insufficient number of fasteners. Manufacturers provide a certain number and type of fasteners with instructions that they all be used, and they do this for a good reason.
  • Lack of insulation. The attic hatch or door is not likely to be weather-stripped and/or insulated, which will allow air from the attic to flow freely into the living space of the home, and this will cause the heating or cooling system to run overtime. An attic hatch cover box can be installed to increase energy savings.
  • Loose mounting bolts, which is typically caused by age, although improper installation will hasten the loosening process.
  • Attic pull-down ladders that are cut too short. The stairs should reach the floor.
  • Attic pull-down ladders that are cut too long. This causes pressure at the folding hinge, which can cause breakage.
  • Compromised fire barrier (when the attic and access are above an attached garage)
  • Attic ladder frame that is not properly secured to the ceiling opening; and
  • closed ladder that is covered with debris, such as blown insulation or roofing material shed during roof work.
  • Cracked steps. This is mostly a problem with wooden ladders.

Safety Tips

  • If yours is a sliding pull-down ladder, there is a potential for it to slide down too quickly, which can lead to an injury. Always pull the ladder down slowly and cautiously.
  • Do not allow children to enter the attic unattended. The lanyard attached to the attic stairs should be short enough that children cannot reach it. Parents can also lock the attic ladder so that a key or combination is required to access it.
  • If possible, avoid carrying large loads into the attic. While a properly installed stairway will safely support an adult, it might fail if you’re carrying a very heavy load. Many trips can be made to reduce the total weight load, if possible.
  • Replace an old, rickety wooden ladder with a new one. The newer aluminum models are lightweight, sturdy and easy to install. If you do install a new ladder, follow the manufacturer’s instructions to the letter, and test the ladder’s operation before actually using it.

 

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